Addressing the HIV Outbreak among People with HIV and the American Indian Community: MATEC Minnesota's HIV Practice Transformation Project Successes

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2020

The Native American Community Clinic (NACC) in Minneapolis has been highly successful in integrating HIV care into their Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). Minnesota has eleven sovereign American Indian (AI) nations1, and the Phillips neighborhood of Minneapolis (where NACC is located) has the third-largest urban AI population in the United States2.

Integrating Behavioral Health and Clinical Care to End the HIV Epidemic among Black Men who have Sex with Men

Publish Date: 
Thursday, October 29, 2020

Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) are more affected by HIV than any other group in the United States. In spite of recent incremental progress to reduce the rate of increase in new HIV infections, Black men continue to account for the largest proportion of new HIV diagnoses among MSM.

AETC Interprofessional Education Training: Shifting Gears in the Time of COVID-19

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, October 20, 2020

At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Northeast/Caribbean (NECA) AIDS Education & Training Center (AETC) found itself in need of a massive shift in its training methods. Within a matter of days, we were faced with shifting all of our in-person learning sessions to an entirely virtual format.

Long-acting Injectable PrEP: Cabotegravir

Publish Date: 
Sunday, September 20, 2020

A long-acting formulation of the investigational integrase inhibitor cabotegravir (CAB) is being studied as a single agent for HIV prevention. (CAB also has been studied, in combination with long-acting rilpivirine, as treatment for people with HIV, see Long-Acting Injectable ART: Cabotegravir + Rilpivirine; this combination has been submitted for FDA approval).

New ARV Approval - Fostemsavir

Publish Date: 
Friday, September 4, 2020

In July 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved fostemsavir (FTR) for treatment of people with multi-drug resistant HIV-1 whose current ARV regimen is failing because of resistance, intolerance, or safety issues. FTR is a novel attachment inhibitor that binds the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 and blocks HIV attachment to the CD4 receptor. It is given orally, 600 mg twice daily.

Short Bites: Testing and Clinical Management of Health Care Personnel Potentially Exposed to HCV — CDC Guidance

Publish Date: 
Friday, September 4, 2020

Recommendations and Reports / July 24, 2020 / 69(6);1–8

Exposure to hepatitis viruses is a recognized occupational risk for health care personnel (HCP). This report establishes new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance that includes recommendations for a testing algorithm and clinical management for health care personnel with potential occupational exposure to hepatitis C virus (HCV).

Weight Gain and Metabolic Complications with ART: Data from AIDS 2020

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Publish Date: 
Saturday, August 29, 2020

Over the past few years, numerous studies have examined weight gain in people with HIV who start or change antiretroviral therapy (ART). While it is clear that some people gain excessive amounts of weight after starting (and sometimes upon changing) ART, the roles of specific antiretroviral (ARV) agents or classes are not entirely clear, nor the mechanisms responsible. Emerging data have been incomplete and contradictory, but concern has been particularly focused on the effects of integrase inhibitors (INSTIs) and of tenofovir alafenamide (TAF).

Safety of Dolutegravir at Conception: Updated Data

Publish Date: 
Saturday, August 29, 2020

In 2018, initial results from the Tsepamo study of birth outcomes in Botswanan women treated with ART during pregnancy raised questions about the safety of dolutegravir (DTG) when given at the time of conception or very early in pregnancy. Specifically, an early interim analysis found a higher proportion of neural tube defects (NTDs) in infants born to women who were taking DTG at the time of conception (0.94%) compared with women taking ART regimens that did not include DTG (0.12%).

Short Bites: Study Shows Oropharyngeal Secretions as Alternative for COVID-19 Detection

Topic: 
Publish Date: 
Thursday, August 13, 2020

As the global battle to understand and eliminate the coronavirus continues, a new study published in the Journal of Dental Research demonstrates that testing of oropharyngeal secretions (OS) may reduce the number of false-negative results from nasal swab testing of patients who have seemingly recovered from the disease.