New Training Tools for Innovative Approaches to Oral Health Care

Topic: 
Publish Date: 
Wednesday, January 29, 2014
According to various studies, 58 to 64 percent of people living with HIV (PLWH) do not receive regular dental care, even though oral health is a critical component of total health for all people. In fact, PLWH are more likely to have an unmet need for oral health care than for medical care. PLWH also experience a high incidence of oral health problems in general, as well as those directly related to HIV infection. Between 32 and 46 percent of PLWH will have at least one major HIV-related oral health problem in their lifetime.

Free, Web-Based Tool Saves Time for Case Managers and Clients

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, January 15, 2014
Grantees, providers, and clients alike are all facing daunting challenges of having to “do more with less.” Identifying and utilizing tools that can save time, reduce errors, and provide higher quality care are important strategies for those who care for the most vulnerable and underserved people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA).

Prevention & Early Detection of Oral Cancer: A Professional Responsibility

Topic: 
Publish Date: 
Friday, December 13, 2013
According to American Cancer Society, over 30,000 Americans are diagnosed with oral cancer (oral cavity and oropharynx) each year, the majority of whom are men over the age of 60. The mortality rate from oral cancer exceeds that of cervical cancer and results in one person dying from the disease or its complications every hour.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HIV/AIDS Bureau (HAB) Graduate/Health Profession Training Programs

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, November 27, 2013

With only about one-quarter of Americans living with HIV being virally suppressed, more Americans becoming newly infected each year, and an aging cohort of HIV specialty care providers (who started providing care to HIV infected persons in the 1980’s), it is essential that health professional training programs incorporate curricula and experience regarding HIV prevention, diagnosis, care, and treatment.   

More on Protease Inhibitors and Corticosteroids

Publish Date: 
Friday, May 18, 2012

It has been demonstrated previously that ritonavir significantly increases serum levels of inhaled and intranasal fluticasone and that coadministration with fluticasone should be avoided. Few studies have examined interactions between PIs and other corticosteroids. At the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, researchers presented results from a randomized controlled PK study of interactions of both darunavir/ritonavir and ritonavir (alone) with inhaled beclomethasone.[1] 

Dolutegravir in Initial Therapy: Two Phase 3 Studies

Publish Date: 
Friday, October 5, 2012

Dolutegravir (formerly known as S/GSK 572) is an investigational integrase inhibitor that is in the late stages of development. It is administered once daily and does not require pharmacokinetic boosting. Two recently presented Phase 3 studies evaluated dolutegravir in combination with nucleoside/nucleotide analogues in treatment-naive subjects.

Switching from Efavirenz to Rilpivirine

Publish Date: 
Monday, January 2, 2012

It has been reported previously that efavirenz reduces serum levels of rilpivirine and that this effect may be prolonged, even after discontinuation of efavirenz (see Sustained Effect of Efavirenz on Rilpivirine Serum Concentrations). A small, nonrandomized study was designed to answer the question of whether it is possible to switch directly from efavirenz to rilpivirine without loss of virologic control.

Darunavir + Raltegravir without NRTIs, revisited

Publish Date: 
Monday, January 2, 2012

In early 2011, a single-arm study of the NRTI-sparing regimen of darunavir/ritonavir (800/100 mg QD) plus raltegravir (400 mg BID) reported worrisome rates of virologic failure, particularly among subjects with baseline HIV RNA levels of >100,000 copies/mL.(1) At ICAAC, researchers involved in a second study to evaluate this combination presented their 24-week results.

Interactions with Hepatitis C Protease Inhibitors

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Rilpivirine and Boceprevir

Boceprevir (BOC) is a hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitor used in combination with pegylated interferon + ribavirin for the treatment of HCV. As BOC is an inhibitor of hepatic cytochrome (CYP) 3A4, and many protease inhibitors and NNRTIs affect or are affected by this hepatic isoenzyme, interactions are expected.

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